Law Enforcement Training on Supply Reduction

Law Enforcement Training on Supply Reduction Peggy Kelley Thu, 10/25/2018 - 02:39 PM EDT

Description

Law enforcement training on supply reduction prepares law enforcement officers to recognize and reduce the availability of illicit drugs and diverted legal substances, including prescription drugs.

Objective(s)

To reduce the availability of prescription drugs for nonmedical use

Typical Elements

  • Supply-reduction training:
    • Can be spread over 2–14 days and is usually conducted in person
    • Covers all drug enforcement laws, including prescription drug diversion
    • Includes some or all of the following topics: tactical aspects of drug enforcement; operational planning; management of confidential sources; recognizing clandestine laboratory operations; legal issues; executive decision-making; professionalism within the ranks; supervising, motivating, and evaluating officers; detecting drug-related crimes; recognizing drug types; and roadside interviewing (Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers [FLETC], n.d.; U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration [DEA], n.d.)
  • Federal and state agencies offer supply-reduction training to state and local law enforcement supervisors and officers on reducing the availability of illicit drugs and diverted legal substances, for example, by preventing prescription drug diversion.
    • Note: The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security primarily support diversion prevention training for state and local law enforcement through the Drug Unit Commanders Academy, Narcotics Supervisor Leadership Program, and FLETC (DEA, n.d.).
  • Federal law enforcement agents receive specialized supply-reduction training through internal programs accredited by the Federal Law Enforcement Training Accreditation (FLETA) board (FLETA, n.d.).
  • Federal agencies fund training and technical assistance centers (TTACs) that support federal, state, and local agencies through training and technical assistance programs, events, and courses on specific topics, including supply reduction (National Training and Technical Assistance Center [NTTAC], n.d.). Supply-reduction training is generally offered through resource guides and in-person courses and is tailored to the agency’s specific circumstances (NTTAC, n.d.).
    • Note: For example, DOJ funded Brandeis University’s Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) TTAC to develop a PDMP training course for law enforcement. The course covered how PDMPs operate; how law enforcement can access and interact with PDMPs; and how to interpret, disseminate, and validate PDMP reports for stakeholders (Brandeis University, 2013).Law enforcement can use PDMP data to help identify potential areas of the community that have high supply.
  • State and local police academies provide specialized diversion courses for state law enforcement officers (Brandeis University, 2013; Morris County Public Safety Training Academy, n.d.).
  • Nonprofit and law enforcement organizations (such as Crime Stoppers USA, the Federal Bureau of Investigation—Law Enforcement Executive Development Association [FBI-LEEDA], the National Association of Drug Diversion Investigators [NADDI], the National Association of State Controlled Substance Authorities, and the Pharmaceutical Security Institute) often partner to offer supply-reduction training and technical assistance which is funded by pharmaceutical industry grants, fundraising, membership fees, and training fees (FBI-LEEDA, n.d.; NADDI, 2015; RxSafetyMatters, n.d., 2013). Typically, these trainings are founded and/or managed by former or current law enforcement personnel and address the following topics: leadership and management, current diversion trends, recognizing diversion activities, and current laws related to supply reduction.

Populations

Law enforcement officers and supervisors

Outcomes

Though not entirely attributable to training efforts, in 2013 law enforcement seized 1,194,748 diverted dosage units of oxycodone, 83,449 diverted dosage units of hydrocodone, and 1,363 diverted dosage units of hydromorphone (DEA, 2014).

Guidelines

Prescription drug monitoring program administrators guide for training law enforcement. 

Acknowledged by

Office of National Drug Control Policy. Epidemic: Responding to America’s Prescription Drug Abuse Crisis. 

Federal Law Enforcement Training Accreditation. Accredited Programs. 

Office of National Drug Control Policy. National Drug Control Strategy 2014. 

U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers. Drug Law Enforcement Training Program (XP). 

U.S. Department of Justice. Narcotic and Dangerous Drug Section (NDDS). 

U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance, National Training and Technical Assistance Center. About Us.

References

Brandeis University. (2013). Prescription drug monitoring program administrators guide for training law enforcement. Waltham, MA: Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Training and Technical Assistance Center, The Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University. Retrieved from http://www.pdmpassist.org/pdf/PDMP_admin/LE_USE_OF_PDMP_CURRICULUM_Final.pdf

Federal Bureau of Investigation—Law Enforcement Executive Development Association. (n.d.). Who we are. Retrieved from https://fbileeda.org/page/Who_we_are

Federal Law Enforcement Training Accreditation. (n.d.). Accredited programs. Retrieved from https://www.fleta.gov/accredited-programs

Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers. (n.d.). Drug law enforcement training program (XP). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Retrieved from https://www.fletc.gov/drug-law-enforcement-training-program-xp/drug-law-enforcement-training-program-xp

Morris County Public Safety Training Academy. (n.d.). Alphabetical course listing. Retrieved from https://academy.morriscountynj.gov/police/course-descriptions/

National Association of Drug Diversion Investigators. (2015). Welcome. Retrieved from https://www.naddi.org/

National Training and Technical Assistance Center. (n.d.). About us. Washington, DC: Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice. Retrieved from https://www.bjatraining.org/about

Office of National Drug Control Policy. (n.d.). HIDTA initiatives. Retrieved from https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/ondcp/hidta-initiatives

RxSafetyMatters. (n.d.). Law enforcement and government: A resource guide to help stem the illegal trafficking of prescription drug abuse. Retrieved from www. rxsafetymatters.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/RXSM_LawEnforceGov-V2.pdf 

U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. (n.d.). Domestic training—State and local training. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice. Retrieved from www. dea.gov/ops/Training/StateLocal.shtml

U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. (2014). National drug threat assessment summary 2014. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice. Retrieved from  https://publicintelligence.net/dea-drug-threats-2014/