Overview: Using This Tool

Overview: Using This Tool Nancy Admin Thu, 10/04/2018 - 03:14 PM EDT

There are a number of ways prevention practitioners can use this tool. Practitioners can:

  • Browse the individual strategy records by domain of interest (e.g., tracking and monitoring or harm reduction) to see which have produced outcomes and target population groups that parallel prevention priorities in their states or communities. For example, which strategies are associated with changes in prescriber behavior, prescription drug misuse, or opioid overdose rates?
  • Check out the objectives (mechanisms of change) for different strategy records to see which strategies address prioritized risk (or protective) factors. For example, if a state is addressing opioid consumption and has prioritized the risk factor “availability” or “access”, which strategies focus on limiting availability of or access to prescription drugs that can be misused or diverted for nonmedical purposes?
  • Review records to identify the critical elements required to understand a given environmental change strategy and its consequences. Click on the links provided in the guidelines for more detailed information.
  • Determine, when reviewing critical elements, whether their states or communities have the resources and abilities necessary for the select strategy, based on their capacity assessment. Practitioners should also identify those areas where they need to build capacity or, if necessary, adapt selected strategies to better fit local circumstances.
  • Find those strategies or programs their states and communities are already using and identify the core elements they hope to track when conducting their process evaluation. This guide can also help practitioners design process evaluation tools.
  • Review references for strategies of interest to determine how others have conducted process and outcome evaluations of specific environmental strategies.

Please note: This tool does not identify or categorize programs as effective or ineffective, nor does it rate strategies based on their strength of evidence. For this reason, we recommend that practitioners use this tool in conjunction with other documents, registries, systems, or research studies that provide information on the evidence of strategy effectiveness, such as those listed in the How Did We Get Here? section. These registries can help practitioners identify strategies that best address substance abuse prevention needs to be identified through careful epidemiological assessment.

  • Persuade members of the public to contact their elected representatives to urge support of, or opposition to, proposed or pending legislation or appropriations or any regulation, administrative action, or order issued by the executive branch of any Federal, state or local government.
  • Attempt to influence Federal, state, or local legislative or executive branches negotiations or actions, including communications to a legislator or executive official that refer to and reflect a view on a specific measure (legislative or executive).

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) fully supports federal restrictions on lobbying using federal funds by HHS grant recipients. In general, recipients of federal funds are not allowed to use said federal funding to lobby federal, state, or local officials or their staff to receive additional funding or influence legislation. As a general matter, these lobbying restrictions preclude recipients from: Spending federal funds to influence an officer or employee of any agency or Congressional member/staff regarding federal awards; using grants funds provided to non-profit organizations or institutions of higher education to influence an election, contribute to a partisan organization, or influence enactment or modification of any pending federal or state legislation; or expending federal funds to influence federal, state, or local officials or legislation.

Appropriations Acts for Fiscal Years 2012, 2013, 2014, and 2015, expand anti-lobbying restrictions and provide:

No part of any appropriation contained in this Act or transferred pursuant to section 4002 of Public Law 111-148 shall be used, other than for normal and recognized executive-legislative relationships, for publicity or propaganda purposes, for the preparation, distribution, or use of any kit, pamphlet, booklet, publication, electronic communication, radio, television, or video presentation designed to support or defeat the enactment of legislation before the Congress or any State or local legislature or legislative body, except in presentation to the Congress or any State or local legislature itself, or designed to support or defeat any proposed or pending regulation, administrative action, or order issued by the executive branch of any State or local government, except in presentation to the executive branch of any State or local government itself.

No part of any appropriation contained I this Act or transferred pursuant to section 4002 of Public Law 111-148 shall be used to pay the salary or expenses of any grant or contract recipient, or agent acting for such recipient, related to any activity designed to influence the enactment of legislation, appropriations, regulation, administrative action, or executive order proposed or pending before the Congress or any State government, State legislature or local legislature or legislative body, other than for normal and recognized executive-legislative relationships or participation by an agency or officer of a State, local or tribal government in policymaking and administrative processes within the executive branch of that government.

The prohibitions in subsections [above] shall include any activity to advocate or promote any proposed, pending or future Federal, State, or local tax increase, or any proposed, pending, or future requirement or restriction on any legal consumer product, including its sale or marketing, including but not limited to the advocacy or promotion of gun control.

Additional information on Federal Restrictions on Lobbying for HHS Financial Assistance Recipients can be found here: https://www.hhs.gov/grants/grants/grants-policies-regulations/lobbying-restrictions.html#xi.